How to make trouble

Iain McIntyre // Melbourne

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    Material from the Australian Museum of Squatting
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    Lock out the Landlords walking tour
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    Pamphlets, books
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    Oral history community radio (see link below)


Iain McIntyre is a writer and community radio broadcaster from Melbourne, Australia. He currently curates the Australian Museum of Squatting blog which includes articles, videos, audio and ephemera from the 1930s to the present day. He is also the author of How To Make Trouble and Influence People, a book which includes 12 interviews and more than 300 images and 500 tales covering Indigenous resistance, convict revolts, picket line hijinks, occupations and creative direct action. His other publications include histories of Australian eviction resistance during the 1930s and an oral history of the successful 1991 AIDEX anti-arms fair protest. Iain has an anthology of American hobo song and prose from the 1880s to 1940s coming out in 2016 and is currently researching the history of environmental blockading in the 1980s as well as the UK and Australian squatting wave of the 1940s.

“A fascinating recovery of Australia’s neglected past and a worthy inspiration to today’s would-be troublemakers.”

– Sean Scalmer

 

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August 5th, 2015

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Graphic History Collective // Canada

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    ...wobbly, communist, on-to-Ottawa Trekker, Spanish Civil War veteran...
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The members of the Graphic History Collective (GHC) originally came together in 2009 to produce a historical comic book about May Day in Canada. With financial support from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the GHC planned to write a comic book that would be educational and inspirational for a cross-section of audiences. Over time new people joined the GHC, adding their skills and talents while sharing a love of history alongside a dedication to social and economic justice. The GHC continues to develop graphic history projects to present historical information about issues that remain important and relevant today. Members so far have included Mark Leier, Robin Folvik, Sean Carleton, Julia Smith, Sam Bradd, and Trevor McKilligan.

“The May Day Graphic History is a wonderful introduction to a major event in labor history and its significance, far too little known in North America.”

– Noam Chomsky

 

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May 23rd, 2014

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Il Caso S. // Bologna



Based in Bologna, Italy, Il Caso S. is a radical history project which emphasises the social value of historical studies. Founded in 2011 by a group of university students, it soon became animated by a larger group of people passionate about history. The collective – which recently turned into cultural association – remains active in finding new and socially inventive ways to curate and communicate history outside academia: from mainly web-based activities to public events, debates and presentations, as well as radio broadcasts and student seminars. Topics covered range from the 1953 workers’ uprising in East Berlin, to the anti-colonialism of Frantz Fanon and the 1977 police shooting of Francesco Lorusso in Bologna. Il Caso S. aim to link the local to the global and use a combination of perspectives and approaches such as those found in the study of labour history, environmental justice, and gender…. to mention but a few.

“A tutti quelli che hanno sempre visto la Storia come uno sforzo inutile e pedante basterà stringere amicizia con un tale Solomon Shereshevsky per ricredersi.”

– Gaia Celeste

 

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May 23rd, 2014

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Unofficial Histories // Hebden Bridge

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    Matt Fish and Rob Logan at Unofficial Histories, Huddersfield, 2014
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    David Rosenberg at Unofficial Histories, Manchester, 2013
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    The International Institute of Social History in Amsterdam
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Unofficial Histories is a public conference to discuss how society produces, presents, and consumes history beyond official and elite versions of the past. Established in 2012, the conference aims to open up to examination the ways in which historians, curators, writers, journalists, artists, archivists, geographers, film makers, musicians, playwrights, activists and others, produce and present the past in the public realm, popular culture and in everyday life. Amongst many other concerns, the conference strives to consider whether the writing, making and ‘doing’ of unofficial histories can have political effects that might serve democratic and emancipatory goals, and if and how they can be seen as sources of dissent and resistance against conventional, privileged models of historical knowledge.

“…a coming together of historians – academic, students and members of the public – to look at history as it is being presented today. It stepped out of the straight jacket of academia and actually took history to the public – an amazing weekend.”

– Janet Sullivan

 

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May 23rd, 2014

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Mariano Maturana // Barcelona

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    The route of anarchism
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    El Árbol de la Libertad (The Tree of Liberty)
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    iBook, 127pp, available from iTunes
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    Augmented Reality projects available for iOS and Android


In 2001, Chilean media artist Mariano Maturana founded the Tactical Tourism project in Barcelona. The project has organised a number of urban interventions in diverse cities drawing on the practices and language of tourism. These interventions use different formats – such as tours on foot or by bus – and employ within them audiovisual media, radio broadcastings, maps, publications and performances.
A striking example is the Route of Anarchism, a tour in Barcelona highlighting the hidden (hi)stories of the great anarcho-syndicalist movement of the city. Since 2009 Mariano Maturana has also developed and designed Augmented Reality projects using mobile devices for further subversive interventions of public spaces. Together with Consol Rodríguez and Manu Valentin, Maturana is also the co-founder of the Barcelona based Augmented Reality research and project group Cierto.

“What makes Tactical Tourism especially interesting is the ways in which it wraps art, tourism and politics together.”

– Pau Obrador & Sean Carter

 

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May 23rd, 2014

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Stoneybatter & Smithfield People’s History Project // Dublin 7

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    1913 Tenement Life
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    Revolutionary women walking tour
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    Lighthouse Cinema, Dublin 7
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    Bob Doyle


The Stoneybatter and Smithfield Peoples History Project is an initiative in Dublin 7. Through a range of events the project wants to promote both the history of the area and also broader Dublin history. Their last bigger event, the Street Stories Festival, took place on the weekend of 26th to 28th September, 2014, and consisted of talks, live music, walking tours, stalls, films and exhibitions.

“Such an important job. Lets recover our real history. To restore the sense of community and share knowledge.”

– Gala Vignoli

 

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May 23rd, 2014

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Interference Archive // Brooklyn NY

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Brooklyn-based Interference Archive explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements. This work manifests in public exhibitions, a study and social center, talks, screenings, publications, workshops, and an online presence. The archive consists of many kinds of objects that are created as part of social movements by the participants themselves: posters, flyers, publications, photographs, books, T-shirts and buttons, moving images, audio recordings, etc. “Through our programming, we use this cultural ephemera to animate histories of people mobilizing for social transformation. We consider the use of our collection to be a way of preserving and honoring histories and material culture that is often marginalized in mainstream institutions. As an archive from below, we are a collectively run space that is people powered, with open stacks and accessibility for all.”

“The Interference Archive is an incredible resource for building community, collective learning and individual transformation.”

– Jamie Heckert

 

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May 23rd, 2014

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Andrea Heubach // Berlin

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    Rebellious Berlin 1847
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    To be published in 2016
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Andrea Heubach offers three tours of radical Berlin: Revolutionary Berlin – a historical tour about how Berlin has been formed by all its inhabitants and their protests, Berlin 1848, and Courageous Women along the tracks of almost forgotten female rebels, representatives of the women’s movements, women who participated in revolutionary struggles as well as activists of the early lesbian subculture and resistance fighters against the Nazi regime.

“A guided tour is no one-way traffic.”

– Berlin Explorer

 

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May 23rd, 2014

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Donal Fallon // Dublin

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    Plaque on Emmet Road, Inchicore, Dublin 8


Donal Fallon is a historian based in Dublin. His primary interests are the social and radical history of the city, from the 1790s right up to contemporary struggles. His publications include a study of Dublin working class gang violence in the 1930s (in Locked Out: A Century of Irish Working Class Life) and a study of Dublin’s Nelson Pillar, blown up by Irish republicans in 1966. He provides tours of the city and teaches accessible Adult Education classes at University College Dublin, and is one of the trio of writers behind the blog Come Here To Me, which explores unusual aspects of Dublin’s history, and which aims to spark greater dialogue and discussion among Dubliners with regards to the history around them. Donal has supported campaigns to erect historical plaques and memorials in the city to reflect Dublin’s revolutionary past, and is currently working on a television documentary project focused on the Republican Congress, a radical movement in 1930s Ireland.

“The blog comeheretome.com shows how amateur online endeavours can eventually morph into more concrete archiving of anecdote, opinion, social history and fact.”

– The Sunday Times

 

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May 23rd, 2014

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Bristol Radical History Group

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    Since 2006
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    Events
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    2 of 28 pamphlets from the Bristol Radical Pamphleteer
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The Bristol Radical History Group was formed in 2006 with a view of opening up some of the hidden history of their home city to public scrutiny, to challenge some commonly held ideas about historical events and approach this history from below. In the tradition of the History Workshop movement the genesis of BRHG was in a sports club rather than the academy. Over the last decade BRHG has been able to successfully integrate the formal lecture with street performance, the organic intellectual with the academic, and engage the public in the excitement of radical history by the use of different media, such as public talks, recreations, film screenings, historic markers and pamphlets. BRHG is currently engaged in several research projects and has helped form a number of community and campaigning history groups in the city.

“Lest we forget, the Bristol Radical History Group has renewed the History Workshop tradition in many ways.”

– Peter Linebaugh

 

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May 23rd, 2014

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